3Arena

The Best Gigs Of 2018 by Aaron Corr

2018 saw some amazing gigs come this way. My absolute best gigs of the year, one, two or three of which are up there in the list of best I’ve ever experienced, I was in attendance but not shooting. So to begin things I’m going to take a look at the best gigs this year that I photographed. Not to be mistaken for the best shows to shoot, these are the best gigs I saw, heard and experienced in all their glory.

Part 1: Best gigs I shot.

Wild Beasts: The Olympia

The band announced their impending split toward the end of 2017, bowing out with three final shows in the new year, one of which was a final Irish show on February 15th in the Olympia Theatre. It was their second last show ever and it was everything you would want from a Wild Beasts gig. They played a selection from all their albums split out over two sets. If you were at a festival and they played either of these sets it would have been brilliant, never mind getting both fully rounded out, and well conceived set lists in one night. There was no support, the whole night was devoted to them and saying goodbye. It sent shivers up my spine at times, and the crowd sang along and reacted like I’d never seen before at one of their shows. They truly ended on a high.

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Paul Draper: Workmans Club

I have to add this to the best of 2018 list, if not for it being great to finally see Paul Draper return to playing gigs, because Mansun’s epic Attack of the Grey Lantern was played in full to mark it’s anniversary. This was an album I came to late in it’s own promotional cycle. I got in to Mansun on time before they ultimately came back with Six, which is one of my favourite albums of all time. Like Wild Beasts, Paul’s gig was comprised of two sets; the first being his solo material (which the crowd lapped up) and then Grey Lantern. It was an incredibly packed and sweaty gig. Paul could let the fans sing as much of the album as needed. It was a fun show. Here’s to when he comes back to pay Six in full.

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Yeah Yeah Yeahs: 3Arena

The Yeah Yeah Yeahs are not a band that swing by Ireland very often. I missed them back around 2002 when they played in the High Stool in Limerick. They seemed happy to just play a festival here every once in a blue moon, and the only times I’ve caught them were at Electric Picnic in 2006 and Longitude in 2013. On this night they were more a co-headliner with Beck than mere support. They were touring the anniversary of debut album Fever to Tell, but this was not just a nostalgia show or a run through the album from start to finish. Karen stalked the stage, singing and screaming to songs from all through their career. They played for a good 1hr 15mins, and given Beck’s delays to get onstage, they may have just pipped him to the post with a longer set. While I enjoyed Beck’s set, the first half was flawless while the second half lagged. That’s why I’m highlighting this as Yeah Yeah Yeah’s show to steal.

Click here for full gallery, and here for The Thin Air’s review.

Rolling Blackout Coastal Fever: Whelans

I am still getting used to saying their name right. Even as I typed the header I got it all mixed up. The Aussie’s brought the heat with them on this night as they gave Whelans a very hot and sweaty August gig. They have just been announced to support Idles in Iveagh Gardens in 2019, turning an already great gig into something extra special. There’s not much else I can add to the review below so just take my word and get an Idles ticket if you haven’t already.

Click here for full gallery and here for The Thin Air’s review..

Julien Baker: Vicar Street

This gig took me by surprise. I was a last minute addition to the list to shoot this show, and I can’t say I’d ever heard a track of Julien’s before that night. Her set was extraordinary, her voice is incredible and the guitar sounds were gorgeous. The gig made the hairs on the back of my neck stand up many a time.

Click here for full gallery, and here for GoldenPlec’s review.

David Byrne: 3Arena

One of my biggest gig regrets was leaving the front of the Electric Arena when David Byrne & St Vincent were to take to the stage, to go to the Main Stage to see another band I loved play an alright set. Everything I heard about the show I missed was that it was an “I was there” moment, and I missed it. Finally getting to see him playing a host of classic Talking Head songs and solo material, while putting on an amazing visual performance on stage in the 3Arena made up for it. The atmosphere with the crowd was one of pure joy, with everyone out of their seats and dancing for the majority of the show. Seeing Slippery People, Naive Melody and Road to Nowhere live will stay with me for a very long time. If he brings the show to a Broadway residency I’ll be booking my tickets first thing.

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Interpol: Olympia Theatre

For the first time ever I went to see a full three night residency of a band in the Olympia. This wasn’t entirely planned on my part, but it’s the way it worked out and I’m all the more delighted for it. Over the three nights they relied on the same foundation of a set list but changed up a lot of tracks on each show. Over three nights they played all but Obstacle 2 from Turn on the Bright Lights.

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Part 2: Best gigs I didn’t shoot.

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Arcade Fire: 3Arena

Seeing Arcade Fire “in the round” was an experience. It brought you closer to the band, the band rotating around the stage so you got different vantage points from the one spot, and the light show topped it off. The set was brilliant, and thankfully didn’t throw in any of the weaker tracks from Everything Now. The show was designed to bring the band and audience together and they succeed completely.

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Nick Cave & the Bad Seeds: Kilmainham

This show goes down as one of the all time best I’ve ever seen. I’ve seen Nick Cave at festivals a few times over the year, and he is truly one of the best, and most passionate performers you’ll ever see. I wondered how he would bring the intimacy of his smaller Skeleton Tree shows to a large outdoor show but he effortlessly pulled it off. Emotions ran high in the crowd during songs like Into My Arms and Distant Sky, and many tears were shed. He still brought the darker songs out for a run through, as well as bringing many fans to the stage during the murderous Stagger Lee. The gig was epic and unforgettable. Not only is this my gig of the year, I think it has safely secured a place in my top five shows of all time.

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The Killers with Franz Ferdinand: RDS

I love a good double header of a gig, especially if it happens to be outdoors and the sun is shining bright. Franz Ferdinand opened the evening for The Killers, and played a shorter version of their Olympia set from earlier in the year. The Killers came on and played a killer set (pardon the pun) and kept the crowd in great form, singing along to all their hits. Brandon channeled an Elvis look in the encore, coming out in a gold suit to finish the night in Las Vegas style.

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Idles: Button Factory

This show goes head to head with David Byrne to battle for my second place for gig of the year. I was happy to not shoot it and just take it all in, especially since it turned out to be dark lighting conditions, and full of strobes for the most part for shooting, and you could barely move an inch with all the jumping and moshing in the crowd. I ended up on stage at one point, jumping around with a bunch of other fans while the band played and in the crowd at the same time. They have provided the album of the year and their show does everything in it’s power to try win it’s place as gig of the year. They’ve got two Dublin shows already in line for 2019, both of which I will be there yelling Danny Nedelko at the top of my lungs.

U2: 3Arena by Aaron Corr

Here was a show and a band I was really looking forward to shooting. I saw their last tour for Innocence & Experience in the 3Arena and it was a great show. I remember seeing great photos from those show my peers, and these were what I had in mind when my opportunity came up. Let’s see what Bono and the boys give me to play with. They had very specific directions for where you had to be for certain songs throughout the show. In my mind this meant the optimal angle to shoot from for how they want to be represented, and the lights should be fantastic.

This was not the case unfortunately.

The first song to shoot was the third in the set, I Will Follow. I got to watch the first two songs from the red zone, which fans pay a couple of hundred Euros for the privilege. During the second song, Bono asked the crowd for some light, so they shone their phone’s torchlight throughout the song. The band took to the stage while Bono remained on the cage platform dividing the crowd. He was facing the thousands of fans, a starry background and it looked amazing. But I couldn’t raise my camera to capture it. My fellow photographers on the night looked at each other, sickened to know what a great shot was being missed out.

Bono came back to the main stage to join The Edge, Adam and Larry and kick in to I Will Follow. Camera were drawn and we got to shoot at the same level as everyone else, fans raised their hands in the air and I did my best to try get above this for clear shots and some with them for an “in the thick of it” effect. Some good moments were ruined by a stray hand, covering a kicking Bono in action. The lights were shining directly down on the crowns of their heads, making their faces be in shadow for the song. These pictures are obviously the better portion of the set, some I’m happy with, some are just tricky. The Edge was so far away from us that he couldn’t be given focus during it, and Larry Mullins was obscured by drum stands from where I stood. This was the closest I was going to get, and I was warned by a photographer who shot the night before, that it only got worse.

Mid set we made our way to an aisle to the right of the arena and set up a fold out step to get an extra bit of height over the crowd. It had very limited effect. We were not allowed to move around due to fire wardens directions. The last row of people were mostly sat on their chairs in front of me to give them extra height to see the show. This removed any possibility to take an arena wide shot of all fans surrounding the band. I had to snap these three songs between heads, arms and hands again. The lighting was poor to shoot in from this distance. The max zoom I had was on my 70-200mm. Bono either was in shadow or had his back to us, facing the other side of the arena. There aren’t many shots I feel happy to show off when saying “I shot U2!!”

Later in the second half of the show, we were ushered back into the arena to shoot New Years Day, as the band performed in from of a European Union flag. We were more centred than the mid gig part of the shoot, but again the lights were not great from that distance, and there was still people stood in front of us which affected how shots were taken. Below is an example of how far away I was shooting from. Once again, no picture from this part of the set makes me feel proud.

The band put on a hell of a show from what I saw between being ushered in and out of the arena, but overall I am a little disappointed by the photos.

David Byrne: 3 Arena by Aaron Corr

This will not only go down as one of the best gigs of the year, but on of the best gigs 'I’ve ever been to. As a life long fan of Talking Heads it was a delight to finally see, and photograph David Byrn in the 3Arena for The Thin Air.

I got to shoot the show from the left and right entrance points on the ground floor. This meant having to avoid all the people coming in with their pints to get to their seats, getting in the way of shots. But this didn’t matter. The lights were solid and perfect for shooting, especially at long range. There was barely any photos deleted from this set, they were all so sharp and lit well.

David started on stage with a table and a brain for the first song. I shot from the left side for this and the second song before legging it over to the right hand side for the third song, I Zimbra. When I was done shooting the band began to play Slippery People and I rushed to get my camera lenses detached and packed away so I could run back to my seat and enjoy the full song on time. The show was a joy to watch from start to finish and I want to see it all over again. Let’s see if it goes to Broadway like the stories suggest.

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May Photos by Aaron Corr

Slow Riot

Slow Riot

May began with two Limerick bands playing The Grand Social.  GoldenPlec sent me to cover London based Whenyoung's first Dublin headline show, but first up on the night was Slow Riot.  

Whenyoung

Whenyoung

Whenyoung took to the stage with quiet confidence and belted out great tune after great tune.  They would later find themselves invited onto the support slot to Nick Cave and Patti Smith in Kilmainham the next month, which is high praise.  They are making great buzz for themselves so the coming year should hold big things for them.

Full gallery.

Noel Gallagher

Noel Gallagher

Last year I photographed Liam, and this year I complete the Oasis set with Noel Gallagher in 3Arena for The Thin Air.  Photographers were restricted to one side of the stage at a time, no shooting from the center areas.  I was delighted when he raised the guitar like a rifle and aimed it at me for a posed shot.  He would do something quirky like this if the right photographer caught his eye at the right time, like sticking his tongue out for another.

Yeah Yeah Yeahs

Yeah Yeah Yeahs

The Yeah Yeah Yeahs finally made a return to Ireland, where they've only played a handful of times in the Republic and never their own headline show since they've become ever more popular.  This night was a double headline show with Beck.  Covering their show for The Thin Air was a massive highlight.  When I arrived at the Arena I was only approved to shoot them, the Beck pass only got confirmed while I was there.

Karen O, as expected, was a legend to shoot.  She wore unique designed clothes and stalked the stage being all kinds of cool.  Brian Chase behind the drums looked like he was having a whale of a time, looking like the happiest drummer on the world I heard someone remark after.  Nick Zinner was just quietly cool to the right, letting the guitar do the talking.  

Full gallery.

Beck

Beck

Beck's pass arrived just before the Yeah Yeah Yeahs shoot, it was to be shot from the soundboard and a contract needed to be signed.  It literally signs away the rights to the photos which I hated to sign, but I knew in all fairness none of his reps are going to be chasing any of us down to get hi-res copies of a photo(s) taken from a soundboard for promo use.  He arrived very late to the stage, due to production delays I presume, and as a result went past curfew to play the same length of a set as YYYs.  He opened with a storming three song intro and the lights were great given how far back I was shooting.  

Pip Blom

Pip Blom

The Thin Air kept me busy in May with The Breeders rescheduled show in Vicar Street, with no storm Ophelia to stop them this time.  Amsterdam band Pip Blom opened up that evening and were a great support.  I look forward to hopefully catching them again.

The Breeders

The Breeders

The Breeders looked delighted to make it back to Dublin after being primed for their last gig but red weather alerts causing everything in the city and country that day to be cancelled.  The lights were quickly lowered and a smokey haze filled the stage, much like the last time I shot them here.  In the brief time between songs the light was at it's best and that's where I managed to snap Kim Deal with a big smile to the crowd as she bantered with them.  This was the type of shot I wanted to get from photographing her.   

Full gallery.

Ezra Furman

Ezra Furman

It had been a while since I was in the Tivoli.  I put my name down with GoldenPlec to cover Ezra Furman's gig there.  Although my name was on the door to shoot, there was no photopass which caused a little bit of annoyance and confusion with security in the venue, even though there was no pit for photographers.  

Full gallery.

Take That: 3Arena by Aaron Corr

My April was spent getting ready for a work trip that I was extending into a long holiday, taking in Orlando, Miami and the Bahamas.  I purposefully held back from shooting too many gigs in advance, however I did have one gig on the calendar for the day I came back and that was this one.  Take That have always put on huge shows with creative visuals for their fans and I didn’t want to let some jet lag get in the way of what would be a fun shoot.

I knew the shoot would be from the middle of the crowd and that a telephoto lens was pretty much all I’d be using.  This doesn’t matter as much with a show of this nature since it’s all about getting the scale of what is on stage.  What I found out after the show was that the best was yet to come, and the first three songs was essentially an empty stage by comparison.  My sister was at the gig and told me how the show kept getting bigger, busier and better, complete with rain which fell in patterns and shapes, band members being raised up to the rafters.  I was there to shoot the three lads in action and I got that, but given the chance to shoot the rest then it would have been icing on the cake.

Bar the distance from the stage to shoot, the only other obstacle was when the crowd got to their feet by the second song.  This meant a lot of dodging and moving to try get the angle I wanted and without people’s heads, hands or phones in the way.  It wasn’t always achievable and either resulted in a little of them getting in the shot or not being able to capture the image at all as planned.  The band moved around the stage quite a bit and were only in the same frame when zoomed in at a handful of times.  The rest of the time they would be separately wandering the circular stage to see other parts of the crowd and give them some face time.

Regardless of how tired I was from my overnight flight and lack of sleep over the last two days, if I was offered a seat to stay I would have been very tempted to stay and see the rest of the show they put on.  As much as they would have been laughable when I was growing up, listening to grunge, Britpop and everything else, they have aged gracefully ( both as a band as well as musically) and are as strong as a three man group and not showing any signs of losing quality for it.

November Photos by Aaron Corr

ABC

ABC

Oops, I forgot to make an October update.  Did anything happen?  Let me think.  Oh yes!  I shot Jean-Michel Jarre and Death Grips, then went on holiday to Berlin and Prague.  I may post about the Death Grips gig in its own little blog as it was one of, if not the worst gigs I’ve ever shot.  I’ll leave those details til then.  Back to now, and by now I mean November.  What seemed like a lackluster month of shooting again turns out to be quite great in the end.  With everything crammed into one week that bled into December I just had it in mind that these all happened in the month of Christmas, and that ABC would be the only gig I’d shoot that month.  Not the case, so let’s begin. 

Martin Fry and ABC played the Olympia earlier in the month.  It was a finely lit show but the only problem is that Martin walked around loads.  Sure, it’s better than a boring front-man standing still and doing nothing interesting, but he’d go to the back of the stage where it wasn’t well lit, then at the front he mostly had the microphone right in his face (he is a singer after all), leaving few clear shots of his face when he was brightly lit.  The best band part to shoot was the interaction between the saxophonist and the guitarist.  

Brand New

Brand New

Later in the month I headed to the double whammy that was the Biffy Clyro, with support from Brand New.  Brand New were all over my social media pages when they last played in Vicar Street a while back.  It seemed like most people I knew were at it, or complaining that they weren’t.  I only really know that one song that was played loads on MTV2 years ago, back when we had music channels that mostly played music.  I expected dark stage and intermittent spells of light on the band and that’s what I got.  The guitarist on the right of the stage was the coolest member to shoot, as he flailed his guitar and hair around on stage. 

Biffy Clyro

Biffy Clyro

I had come for Biffy however.  Though I’m not a fan of them, I was looking forward to shooting their show.  I knew they’d be energetic, have great lights and leave me with some cool shots to use.  They didn’t disappoint.  The downside was the band’s own video cameras rigs in the pit, and how extra high the stage was to shoot.  It didn’t take a whole lot away from the shoot but the higher the stage, the harder it is to take in a cool shot of the band giving it their all on stage in a wide shot.  I expected Simon Neil to be topless throughout so lucky for me, and not for any admirers looking at the pictures, he had a long white scientist/doctor coat on throughout.  

Hinds

Hinds

Hinds are a band that were on my radar a while but who had yet to play Ireland.  I’d see cool pictures of them pop up in my Instagram feed by great photographers I follow so when I saw they were playing I put my name down for it.  It was quite last minute as it wasn’t well advertised, or at least nothing stood out to me that they were coming.  It was supposed to be The Academy but was moved to the smaller, basement level Academy 2 due to sales.  This made for a far better gig as the space was packed with an enthusiastic crowd, something that gets lost in a half empty, bigger venue.  The tour manager gave the go ahead for photos to be taken during the last 3 songs.  That left me and fellow photographer, Colm Kelly, triying to count the songs out from the napkin set list on stage, a short distance away.  The tour manager swung by again and said we could get 2 songs mid set as well.  I’d seen in images that they tend to crowd surf and realized only then that I should have brought a flash just in case, though we’re never allowed to use it for the regular first three/no flash shoots.  This may have been a different case.

The pit was tiny, which made for awkward to squeeze into position, with the singer, Carlotta, asking if she could grab her drink from the space before I tried squeeze by.  The lights never changed and the girls were well lit, but for each time I went into the pit I didn’t shuffle around too much for different angles in case I’d annoy fans at the barrier or the band.  We shot the last 2 songs, having miscounted, but the band discussed among themselves and did a three song encore.  The tour manager gave us the thumbs up to stay where we were.  I needn’t have worried about the flash for any crowd surfing.  The band opted not to, maybe because of the tight space between the crowd’s heads and the roof of the room.  You could tell they wanted to though, they seemed to like Dublin.

Bo Ningen

Bo Ningen

I was looking forward to potentially shooting Primal Scream during the month and thankfully the photo pass came my way.  I headed along early to shoot the Japanese support, Bo Ningen.  I figured it was going to be a mass of long hair waving every which way.  Combine that with dark red and blue/purple lights and it makes for a tough edit in Lightroom afterwards.

Primal Scream

Primal Scream

Primal Scream on the other hand can teach many a band a few things about stage lighting.  It was perfect, for the first and third song at least.  Straight from the start Bobby Gillespie was wandering the stage, doing his rock star poses, clapping and doing his thing.  It was hard to take a bad shot, though of course I did initially because all my camera settings were prepared for a darker stage and everything was blown out for the first burst of images.  That was quickly fixed.  I tended to stick with the 24-70mm on the Canon 6D and only used the 70-200mm zoom on the Canon 7D a little for the odd close up.  This is my standard practice but in this instance I wanted to capture the full stage and as much of the band as I could.  The set was laced with hits and the band were in top form.  More bands should take note of their use of stage lights.  Then again, that might make the job a little too easy.

Click an image to see the full gallery.

April/May Gigs by Aaron Corr

The one and only April gig I got to shoot was Girl Band in Vicar Street.  They'd been cancelling and rescheduling gigs since their album came out last September so it was great to see them in flying form.  They are an absolute beast to behold, fuzzy, distorted and loud.  I've seen them a few times in the past but not since they've become an internationally hyped band, doing as well overseas as most Irish bands can only dream of.  Dara is an electric front man, he doesn't pander to the audience or play a showman.  He just does his thing, looks confident yet somewhat uncomfortable and on the verge of a full on screaming frenzy at any given second.    The show was fine to photograph, there was no backdrops, no fancy lights, just solid yellow lamps for the most part.  The guitarist and bassist were less well lit unfortunately but that's standard & was not a total loss for taking photos.    For the rest of April there wasn't much on that interested me and I was busy with non concert related things so I kept my calendar clear.   

The one and only April gig I got to shoot was Girl Band in Vicar Street.  They'd been cancelling and rescheduling gigs since their album came out last September so it was great to see them in flying form.  They are an absolute beast to behold, fuzzy, distorted and loud.  I've seen them a few times in the past but not since they've become an internationally hyped band, doing as well overseas as most Irish bands can only dream of.  Dara is an electric front man, he doesn't pander to the audience or play a showman.  He just does his thing, looks confident yet somewhat uncomfortable and on the verge of a full on screaming frenzy at any given second.  

The show was fine to photograph, there was no backdrops, no fancy lights, just solid yellow lamps for the most part.  The guitarist and bassist were less well lit unfortunately but that's standard & was not a total loss for taking photos.  

For the rest of April there wasn't much on that interested me and I was busy with non concert related things so I kept my calendar clear.

 

Kula Shaker played the Academy to a reasonable sized crowd seeking some 90s nostalgia, like myself.  I was a big fan of the band around 96/97 after Tattva came out and had only seen them the once at the Trip to Tipp, supporting Foo Fighters, Manic Street Preachers and The Prodigy.    It was a hit laden set with choice newer tracks from albums later in their career, one or two of which stood out.  Crispian Mills still has the energy of his hey day and made for a good front man to shoot as he would jump from time to time.  The lights were the Academy's usual harsh blues and purples which can be a frustrating time when editing afterwards.

Kula Shaker played the Academy to a reasonable sized crowd seeking some 90s nostalgia, like myself.  I was a big fan of the band around 96/97 after Tattva came out and had only seen them the once at the Trip to Tipp, supporting Foo Fighters, Manic Street Preachers and The Prodigy.  

It was a hit laden set with choice newer tracks from albums later in their career, one or two of which stood out.  Crispian Mills still has the energy of his hey day and made for a good front man to shoot as he would jump from time to time.  The lights were the Academy's usual harsh blues and purples which can be a frustrating time when editing afterwards.

Sadly Jeff Lynne's ELO had to cancel their original appearance to the 3Arena due to his bad throat, luckily it was just put off by eight days to the following Saturday and I was still available to do it.  In one way it's unfortunate to do a shoot from the sound desk, or in this case the lighting desk on the balcony but this concert definitely benefited from being able to take it all in from afar.  The light show is incredible.  The other major gripe I had was that I couldn't stay to watch and listen to the whole show, it was a pure treat for the three songs I was present for.

Sadly Jeff Lynne's ELO had to cancel their original appearance to the 3Arena due to his bad throat, luckily it was just put off by eight days to the following Saturday and I was still available to do it.  In one way it's unfortunate to do a shoot from the sound desk, or in this case the lighting desk on the balcony but this concert definitely benefited from being able to take it all in from afar.  The light show is incredible.  The other major gripe I had was that I couldn't stay to watch and listen to the whole show, it was a pure treat for the three songs I was present for.

I was excited to see Blossoms finally.  Due to getting my pass far too late in the night I missed their Academy 2 show a few months back, where support came from Viola Beach, who had a fatal car accident the following weekend in Sweden.  Blossoms were supporting The Last Shadow Puppets on their three dates in the Olympia.  The let down was that the band were at the very front of the stage with little to no direct lighting on them.  You'd swear it was coming out of their budget I joked to others in the pit.  The odd flash from a strobe helped me catch an okay shot of the singer but apart from that the drummer and one of the guitarists got the best look in for the shoot. 

I was excited to see Blossoms finally.  Due to getting my pass far too late in the night I missed their Academy 2 show a few months back, where support came from Viola Beach, who had a fatal car accident the following weekend in Sweden.  Blossoms were supporting The Last Shadow Puppets on their three dates in the Olympia.  The let down was that the band were at the very front of the stage with little to no direct lighting on them.  You'd swear it was coming out of their budget I joked to others in the pit.  The odd flash from a strobe helped me catch an okay shot of the singer but apart from that the drummer and one of the guitarists got the best look in for the shoot. 

Finally, the last gig of May was The Last Shadow Puppets.  This was the first of three shows, the one show that wasn't sold out.  The lights wer far better than Blossoms but it still was tricky to shoot.  The lights were either too harsh, or once you had focused and composed a shot, dimmed to leave them in shadow.  Add to this the movement of the enthusiastic front men.  I stayed for most of the show, only skipping on the encore when I had my fill of their cocky, over confident, smarmy, and in Miles Kane's case laddish behavior.  Alex Turner has an effortless cool to him but he veers close to being dis-likable.  They have good songs, but not enough to keep my interest for the long set list they had laid out in front of them.  Click any photo to see the full set associated.

Finally, the last gig of May was The Last Shadow Puppets.  This was the first of three shows, the one show that wasn't sold out.  The lights wer far better than Blossoms but it still was tricky to shoot.  The lights were either too harsh, or once you had focused and composed a shot, dimmed to leave them in shadow.  Add to this the movement of the enthusiastic front men.

I stayed for most of the show, only skipping on the encore when I had my fill of their cocky, over confident, smarmy, and in Miles Kane's case laddish behavior.  Alex Turner has an effortless cool to him but he veers close to being dis-likable.  They have good songs, but not enough to keep my interest for the long set list they had laid out in front of them.

Click any photo to see the full set associated.